Friday, March 02, 2018

What to do When Things Aren't Going Your Way #golf

Whether your golf ball consistently finds the water or you are playing military golf (left, right, left, right), there are some days that you wished you never played the sport. When things aren't going your way on the golf course and you can't get into the zone, don't chuck your clubs in the pond! Here is what you need to do.

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Even the tour pros have bad days and suffer from nerves or tension... which leads to a tight grip, pulled or pushed swing, the yips, and/or condescending mental attitude. One bad swing can lead to two and a round can blow up for the best of players.

Trying to hit "perfect shots" and negative self-talk can wreak havoc on your round!

Chez Reavie, a PGA Tour pro, won a tournament in his rookie season and began pushing for results instead of hitting shots one at a time. When his game began to collapse, he analyzed his thoughts - he may have been judging himself too harshly - and backed off a bit.
"I needed to realize that just because I hit this shot poorly or that it didn't go perfect, it has zero bearing on the next shot that I hit," Reavie said.
 "The next shot that I hit could be the best shot that I ever hit…It didn't matter. I started thinking about that and was like, 'Wow. I've never really looked at it that way.' I was always like, 'Oh, s---, I pulled my last 7-iron so let's try and hold this one off a bit. Well, then I'd probably hit the next one to the right. I was just chasing my tail, whereas this way, every shot was a fresh start."
If you are not playing in a tournament, this is a great time to change your mindset during the round work on your game. Turn a bad round into an opportunity to work out the kinks in your game. If you are playing in an event, take a tip from Reavie and start playing the game one shot at a time.

For the beginner, average (or better than average golfer), Golf for Beginners offers up these bullet points to remember when you see your game starting to collapse.

1. Remember that golf is a mental game - you may not be physically swinging the golf club well today but the way you talk to yourself is important - use your mind to turn your game around. Think about the good shots and keep your chin up. (Re-read Chez Reavie's quote above...every shot is a fresh start).

2. Whether or not you are in a tournament, if things aren't going your way, stop looking at your score and put the scorecard in your pocket. Instead, play each shot one at a time, stay in the present moment and don't worry about the final outcome.

3. DON'T QUIT or think of quitting - it is easy to just stop playing golf. and sulk. Always finish your round. Stop being a perfectionist and understand that golf is a game of working past bad shots.

As I read in Psychology Today, author and coach Fred Shoemaker stated, "ultimately golf is just a motion of the body, a club, a ball, an intention, and a target." Keep your highs and lows in check and you will improve your score and mental attitude during any round.


What do you do when things aren't going your way on the golf course? Share in the comments section of this golf blog and tag us on Twitter @Golf4Beginners.

1 comment:

Mr Beste said...

Ok, I just wanted to clear something up from my previous email.

It seems my suggestion about how Mr Miyagi and the Karate Kid could help you create your perfect, powerful and repeatable golf swing confused some people…and even caused some concern that I’d lost my marbles!

I know the connection sounds a bit crazy, but let me explain…

In my last email I said: “If you remember why Mr Miyagi was teaching the Karate Kid to “Wax On, Wax Off”, then Michael’s 6 Step Golf Lesson will make perfect sense to you.”

No?…Still not making any sense?

Well, it’s all about the true secret to a powerful, repeatable golf swing….muscle memory. Here’s what I mean:

(If you’ve never seen the 1980’s Karate Kid movie and plan to watch it soon, this is a spoiler alert!)

In the film, the young student, Daniel, asked the old Master, Mr Miyagi, to teach him karate. When Mr Miyagi reluctantly agreed, Daniel expected to be trained how to kick butt right then and there. Instead Mr Miyagi confused his eager student by making him polish his old car. But more importantly he insisted Daniel use very specific arm movements. So, using big outward circular movements Daniel had to “wax on” with one hand and “wax off” with the other.

Absolutely nothing to do with karate…or so we thought! We were so wrong!

It turns out that later in the movie young Daniel uses these exact “wax on, wax off” movements to powerfully deflect incoming punches and kicks from his nasty opponent.

Daniel unknowingly learned these vital defence moves easily, embedding them deep in his muscle memory, so they became second-nature and completely automated.

That’s what Michael Bannon’s 6 Step Golf Lesson does for your golf swing.

See it here now. ===> No.1 Golf Coach Reveals Simple Technique <=====

It embeds your perfect swing deep in your muscle memory, automating it and creating more power and accuracy.

The training is unique but it’s not difficult, in fact you might be tempted to think it’s TOO EASY…but don’t let yourself be fooled. Just like the karate kid, have faith in the Master’s teaching.

Check it out for yourself right here. ===> Karate helps golf?…Really?? <=====

Just as Daniel put his trust in Mr Miyagi, you can put your trust in Michael Bannon. After all, if Rory McIlroy believes in him, I guess you can too.

See you inside.

P.S. Remember to K.I.S.S. Check it out here. ===> No.1 Golf Coach Reveals Simple Technique <=====