Thursday, November 15, 2018

An Odd Golf Coincidence?

golf flag reflection
For those people who believe in odd coincidences...Matt Kuchar and Lee Westwood have more of an attachment than just being pro golfers.

Was it just their "time" or did fate play a role in the same day wins of both Matt Kuchar and Lee Westwood? This fact, by itself, would appear coincidental but there's more...both golfers also won on the same day four years ago (April 20, 2014) and not again until this past Sunday (even though both have been in contention).

I wonder if any betting parlor determined the odds of this Kuchar - Westwood happening...a million to one? As much as lightning striking in the same place twice? Will this same occurrence happen again in 2022?

Being unable to solve this riddle, Golf for Beginners moves on to what Kuchar and Westwood did to secure their victories. Below are a few quotes from the pros.

Matt Kuchar was hoping to create more of a cushion for himself, "I certainly didn’t want a 3-footer on the last hole to win this thing, I was hoping to have a three-, four-shot lead and some wiggle room."

Lee Westwood's plan was to remain calm, aim and shoot at his target, "Until now, my emotions have felt really under control all day, which is what I’ve been working on. I was just trying to hit fairways and stick to my game plan and hit it in the right places.”

How can amateurs use Kuchar's and Westwood's plans to secure their own wins, whether it's with their regular foursome or at a business tournament?

To gain more of a cushion during your golf round, try hitting more safe shots to get onto the green in regulation, giving yourself more birdie opportunities.

As far as remaining calm, take a deep breath before each shot. With regards to aiming and shooting at a target, you should first have a repeatable pre-shot routine - after this process is "in the bag", try visualizing one shot at a time.


Photo by Peter Lewicki on Unsplash

1 comment:

Scott Cole said...

It was good to see a couple of the old guys win. Golf at the top level seems to have become a young man's game, especially with stats indicating length off the tee is now more important than accuracy.